Homeschool


"To 'endeavour ourselves' to the daily effort of education, to live and act, think and speak before the children, so that they shall be hourly the better for all that we are, is harder, no doubt, than to make one enormous sacrifice."

--Charlotte Mason {Vol. 5, p. 156}





And then we want to study also the principles, and to get the very best teachers we can to teach our children; see that they are men and women who fear God and keep his commandments. We do not want men or women to teach the children of Latter-day Saints who are not Latter-day Saints themselves. Hear it you Elders of Israel, and you school-trustees! We want none of these things. Let others who fear not God take their course; but it is for us to train our children up in the fear of God. God will hold us responsible for this trust. Hear it, you Elders of Israel and you fathers and you mothers! Talking about education, as I said before, Joseph Smith knew more in regard to true education than all the philosophers and scientists of the earth; and he knew it by the revelations of God.
-John Taylor, Journal of Discourses 20:179


There is a spirit working among the Saints to educate their own offspring. If our children will be all we will have for a foundation of glory in eternity, how needful that they be properly trained... There are wolves among us in sheep's clothing ready to lead astray our little ones... Wolves do not devour old sheep when there are any young ones. I have herded sheep long enough to know that. Look after your children.
-John W. Taylor  (Collected Discourses 2:138.)




A very common misconception associated with homeschooling is that homeschooled children lack socialization and, therefore, are social misfits unable to communicate with others. Anyone who has raised multiple children can attest to the fact that all children are born with different personalities. We are all very different beings, physically and spiritually. Some of us are born with a need to socialize with those around us in order to feel accepted. Others seclude themselves and are perfectly content having few or no friends at all. One is not any more correct than the other. This misconception creates an assumption which eliminates any room for the belief that we are children of God with unique personalities and talents. It also stands as proof of just how reliant upon government our society has become, to think that we cannot even function socially, without government assistance. It assumes that the Department of Education is responsible for our personalities and that all publicly educated children are social butterflies anxiously awaiting their next conversation with a complete stranger. -Jordan Porter, Fleeing the Bondage of Public Schools



 “Parents . . . do you surround your sons and daughters with every safeguard to shield them from the arts of the vile? . . . Or do you leave them in their ignorance and inexperience to mix with any society they may choose, at any hour that may be convenient to them, and to be exposed to the wiles of the seducer and the corrupt?  These are questions you will all have to answer either to your shame and condemnation or to your joy and eternal happiness.” 
-John Taylor, quoted here



A man may possess a profound knowledge of history and mathematics; he may be an authority in psychology, biology, or astronomy; he may know all the discovered truths pertaining to geology and natural science; but if he has not with this knowledge that nobility of soul which prompts him to deal justly with his fellow men, to practice virtue and holiness in personal life, he is not a truly educated man. Character is the aim of true education; and science, history, and literature are but means used to accomplish the desired end. Character is not the result of chance work but of continuous right thinking and right acting. True education seeks, then, to make men and women not only good mathematicians, proficient linguists, profound scientists, or brilliant literary lights, but also honest men, combined with virtue, temperance, and brotherly love-men and women who prize truth, justice, wisdom, benevolence, and self-control as the choicest acquisitions of a successful life."

David O. McKay, Gospel Ideals, pp. 440-441



A government system of education in Prussia is not inconsistent with the theory of Prussian society, for there all wisdom is supposed to be lodged in the government. But the thing is wholly inadmissible here . . . because, according to our theory, the people are supposed to be wiser than the government. Here, the people do not look to the government for light, for instruction, but the government looks to the people. The people give the law to the government. To entrust, then, the government with the power of determining the education which our children shall receive is entrusting our servant with the power to be our master. This fundamental difference between the two countries, we apprehend, has been overlooked by the board of education and its supporters.
-Orestes Brownson, Testimony against proposed Truancy Laws before the Massachusetts Board of Education, 19th Century




Thought breeds thought; children familiar with great thoughts take as naturally to thinking for themselves as the well-nourished body takes to growing;
and we must bear in mind that growth, physical, intellectual, moral, spiritual,
is the sole end of education.
--Charlotte Mason



"...Invite young people to explore, to experiment, and to learn for themselves... Young people increasingly need to be learners who act and thereby receive additional light and knowledge by the power of the Holy Ghost—and not merely passive students who primarily are acted upon..."

~Elder David A. Bednar, October 2011 General Conference




The direction in which education starts a man will determine his future life.
- Plato



It should be your care, therefore, and mine, to elevate the minds of our children and exalt their courage; to accelerate and animate their industry and activity; to excite in them an habitual contempt of meanness, abhorrence of injustice and inhumanity, and an ambition to excel in every capacity, faculty, and virtue. If we suffer their minds to grovel and creep in infancy, they will grovel all their lives.

-John Adams,
Dissertation on the Canon and Feudal Law, 1756



Perhaps the most valuable practical lesson the child gets from nature-study is a personal knowledge that nature's laws are not to be evaded. Wherever he looks, he discovers that attempts at such evasion result in suffering and death. A knowledge thus naturally attained of the immutability of nature's "must" and "shall not" is in itself a moral education. The realiztaion that the fool as well as the transgressor fares ill in breaking natural laws makes for wisdom in morals as well as in hygiene.
-Handbook of Nature Study, pg 2





There are three kinds of human knowledge which stand strikingly distinct from all the rest. They lie at the foundation. They constitute the roots of the tree. In other words, they are the means, by which all other knowledge is acquired. I need not say, that I mean, Reading, Writing, and Calculation.

Teachers do not perhaps always consider, how entirely and essentially distinct these three are from all the rest. They are arts; the acquisition of them is not to be considered as knowledge, so much as the means, by which knowledge may be obtained. A child, who is studying Geography, or History, or Natural Science, is learning facts,--gaining information ; on the other hand, the one who is learning to write, or to read, or to calculate, may be adding little or nothing to his stock of knowledge. He is acquiring skill, which, at some future time, he may make the means of increasing his knowledge, to any extent.

This distinction ought to be kept constantly in view, and the teacher should feel that these three fundamental branches stand by themselves, and stand first in importance. I do not mean to undervalue the others, but only to insist upon the superior value and importance of these. Teaching a pupil to read, before he enters upon the active business of life, is like giving a new settler an axe, as he goes to seek his new home in the forest. Teaching him a lesson in history, is, on the other hand, only cutting down a tree or two for him.

The Teacher" by Jocob Abbott, 1844. p. 64
Quoted here.



The whys of doing TWTM skills even though they are hard, boring, and miserable:

I think the key to being able to write well is to read tons of well-written material (like great books), to have the physical part down so you don't have to think about it (handwriting and typing), to have something to write about (good knowledge base and good research skills), to have a system of taking the mishmash of thought and putting them together in an organized way (find a method of putting them down in an unorganized way, organize them into a linear structure (outlining), and then rewrite - word processor is nice for this). You need to work on narration and logic for organization, vocabulary and grammar for style. Copywork and dictation deal with the mechanics of spelling and punctuation in a whole-to-parts way and spelling books and grammar books deal with it in a parts-to-whole way. You need to do the narration and the dicatation in order to put the pieces together and apply them.
-Nan in Mass



"Let them once get in touch with Nature, and a habit is formed which will be a source of delight through life. We were all meant to be naturalists and it is inexcusable to live in a world so full of the marvels of plant and animal life and to care for none of these things."

-Charlotte Mason



"Hillary Clinton says it takes a village to raise a child. I've seen the village; and I don't want it raising my child."
- unknown




"We believe in education, and we spend a substantial part of our budget on the education of our young people. We expect them to think. We expect them to investigate. We expect them to use their minds and dig deeply for knowledge in all fields. If we have a motto, it is this: ‘The glory of God is intelligence.’ "
-Gordon B. Hinckley
(Teachings of Gordon B. Hinckley [1997], 127)




I never teach my pupils. I only attempt to provide the conditions in which they can learn.
-Albert Einstein




Parents give up their rights when they drop the children off at public school.

-Melinda Harmon, U.S. Federal Judge, 1996




Knowledge of truth, combined with proper regard for it, and its faithful observance, constitutes true education. The mere stuffing of the mind with a knowledge of facts is not education. The mind must not only possess a knowledge of truth, but the soul must revere it, cherish it, love it as a priceless gem.
-Joseph F. Smith




The home is the laboratory of our lives, and what we learn there largely determines what we do when we leave there.

—President Thomas S. Monson; Ensign, Nov. 1988, 69




And also trust no one to be your teacher nor your minister, except he be a man of God, walking in his ways and keeping his commandments.
-Mosiah 23:14




The Lord organized the family unit in the beginning. He intended that the home be the center of learning—that the father and mother be teachers... The Lord fixed families to give parents more influence on children than all other agencies combined. There is safety in this arrangement.
-A. Theodore Tuttle, Ensign, Nov. 1979 pg 28




Some people wonder, why be a stay-at-home mother? Some people question, aren't we wasting our time, our potential? Absolutely not. I know my potential has not gone unfulfilled. ... Is the world okay without another city planner? I think so. But, oh how much I've learned about child development and education, and we're changing the WORLD! ... He's going to grow into an exceptionally empathetic and attentive dad. Our goal of course is preparing him for the world of work, yes, but so much more. We devote ourselves to fostering his natural love for learning, developing strong character, and yes, we pray and teach him about God.
-Shawn, on Abecedarian Academy





"Home should be the center of one's earthly experience, where love and mutual respect are appropriately blended."
-L. Tom Perry, Ensign Nov 2002, page 9




Adam spent much effort being the school teacher for his children. He and Eve taught their sons and daughters. He taught them the gospel in their home evenings, and he taught them reading and writing and arithmetic. And they kept their books of remembrance.
-Spencer W. Kimball





Knowledge which is acquired under compulsion has no hold on the mind. Therefore do not use compulsion, but let early education be a sort of amusement; you will then be better able to discover the child's natural bent.

-Plato




What we want to see is the child in pursuit of knowledge,
not knowledge in pursuit of the child.
-George Bernard Shaw





What has happened to our schools? There are still many that are excellent, but there are very many that are failing. What has become of the teaching of values? We are told that educators must be neutral in these matters. Neutrality in the teaching of values can only lead to an absence of values. Is it less important to learn something of honesty than to learn something of computer science? . . . Where today are the heroes from whose lives we learned honesty and integrity and the meaning of work? The debunkers of Washington and Lincoln have done their job and we all are the poorer for it.
President Gordon B. Hinckley
Speech given at the U.S. Conference of Mayors,
Salt Lake City, Utah, September 25, 1998




I am opposed to free education as much as I am opposed to taking property from one man and giving it to another who knows not how to take care of it... I do not believe in allowing my charities to go through the hands of robbers who pocket nine-tenths themselves and give one tenth to the poor... Would I encourage free schools by taxation? No!
-Brigham Young
(Journal of Discourses Vol. 18, p. 357)

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